State News

January 9, 2018, News & Observer: 

NC Congressional Districts Struck down as Unconstitutional

Partisan Gerrymanders

State economic tier rankings leave WNC counties unchanged

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail

The North Carolina Department of Commerce released its 2018 county tier rankings for economic well-being on Friday, which included the good news that no county in Western North Carolina moved into a category of greater economic distress.Salaries of top county employees

However, the bad news is that none of the counties, some of which rate in the most-distressed group, improved into a higher category either.

This is the first time in recent years that the tiers for Western North Carolina counties have been static.

Last year Haywood County recovered to Tier 3 after spending a year at Tier 2. Meanwhile, Mitchell and Cherokee counties declined to Tier 1 when the rankings for 2017 were released a year ago.

Despite these incremental changes, the median tier for the 19-county region has been constant at 1.74 over the last four years. In theory that suggests the region tends toward economic distress and has made little progress, but that doesn’t account or population imbalances between counties. More than half of the region’s population is in the four “least distressed” counties, Buncombe, Henderson, Haywood and Wautaga.

Why tiers matter

The ratings can be important because they are “incorporated into various state programs to encourage economic activity in less prosperous areas of the state.” Even though being Tier 1 suggests a county’s economic situation is bleak, it could improve the county’s chances of getting state support for the recruitment or expansion of industries that could bring new jobs and increase the tax base.

What the tiers actually say about conditions in each county and how meaningful that is may be a subject for debate. Department of Commerce Communications Director David Rhoades, talked with Carolina Public Press by email last week about some of these issues.

“Companies that are considering a North Carolina location focus on the key factors that will help their business be successful in a given location; such as the regional workforce, the number of available buildings, or transportation accessibility,” Rhoades said.

“A location’s tier level is rarely if ever mentioned by companies when they approach (the Department of Commerce), and if those fundamental business factors aren’t present, the tier level won’t come into play.  While Tier 1 or 2 locations can qualify for somewhat more generous economic development incentives, depending on the program, Tier 3 status indicates a county has less economic distress, which is obviously a good thing.

How tiers work

One would think that a state goal would be for every county to rank as “least distressed,” which is Tier 3. But because of how the tiers work, that will never happen. Neither would all counties rank as Tier 1, or “most distressed,” even during a major economic crisis.

The key to understanding the state’s tier system is that the Department of Commerce rates the counties relative to each other, not some external standard of well-being. So even if a county experiences a boom or a bust in a given year, if every other county experiences relatively the same economic trend, the tiers may remain the same.

Exactly 40 county will always be ranked as “most distressed” or Tier 1. Exactly 40 will be ranked in the middle category, Tier 2. The remaining 20 of North Carolina’s 100 counties will be ranked as Tier 3, or “least distressed.”

According to the Commerce Department, the facts used to rank the counties and determine which category each falls into include average employment rate, median household income, percentage growth in population and adjusted tax base per capita.

In addition, several factors automatically qualify counties for lower tiers.

Any county with less than 50,000 automatically qualifies for Tiers 1 or 2. Those that have been Tier 1 during the two previous years and either have less than 12,000 people or that have less than 50,000 and a poverty rate of at least 19 percent automatically qualify for Tier 1.

“The sorting process works like this – the four factors that make up the economic indicators are analyzed first, and then the adjustment factors are considered,” Rhoades explained. “Only after those two steps are complete is a tier level assigned.  So, in other words, it’s not like one step covers mandatory numbers and the other step isn’t mandatory as well – the economic indicators and the application of adjustment factors are both necessary.”

The automatic qualifiers could, in theory, throw off the 40-40-20 breakdown, but the county populations are such that this can’t happen right now, Rhoades said.  “From a practical standpoint, given the populations in all 100 counties, this situation has not arisen and is unlikely to arise,” he said.

Limitations

The criteria for evaluation counties as well as the automatic qualifying factors probably fit some counties better than others, so that the economic prosperity or despair in a given county could be different from what its tier implies.

For instance, the Department of Commerce treats population growth as a positive indicator, even though taken alone it could represent an increase in the number of poor residents. This is offset somewhat by other criteria that look at household income and per capita measures.

However, the system has no obvious way to compensate for the opposite trend. If a very small county that has previously been Tier 1 for several years experiences an economic boom that does not include an increase in population, it could remain Tier 1 indefinitely through automatic qualification. This could happen especially in counties that experience a boom in tourism and seasonal residents who are not captured in the demographic data used to evaluate the counties.

WNC county tiers

Avery  2

Buncombe  3

Burke  2

Cherokee  1

Clay  1

Graham  1

Haywood  3

Henderson  3

Jackson  1

Macon  1

Madison  2

McDowell  1

Mitchell  1

Polk  2

Rutherford  2

Swain  1

Transylvania  2

Watauga  3

Yancey  1

North Carolina House Democrats – October 26, 2017

Federal judges appointed a Special Master today to review and possibly redraw unconstitutional districts from the latest Republican gerrymandered map. Today’s news makes it clear the federal court believes the Republicans are still illegally drawing districts based on race.

In a court order released today, federal judges named a Special Master to review House districts in Sampson/Wayne, Wake, Guilford, and Mecklenburg counties to address their concern that these districts “failed to remedy the identified constitutional violation or are otherwise legally unacceptable.”

The judges and Special Master will carefully review the legality of the districts in question. This is a significant win for democracy and should be encouraging to North Carolina voters. The districts drawn in 2011 were drawn for the sole purpose of facilitating and ensuring a Republican majority in the General Assembly – disenfranchising thousands of voters in the process.  With fairer, more competitive maps drawn by an outside source, voters will have the opportunity to pick their representation instead of the other way around.

House Democrats are working every day to recruit phenomenal candidates across the state, and meet aggressive fundraising goals so that we can support those candidates. 2018 will North Carolina’s first legal legislative election since 2011 – and we could change the course of our state.

Screen Shot 2017-06-23 at 7.25.46 PM

General Assembly News

GOP budget short on vision, long on breaks for the rich
N&O // Editorial // June 20, 2017

Summary: “It’s hard to say which is worse: that Republicans boast of all their puny good deed-doing for teachers and lower-income people in the state budget, or that they think so little of the citizens they represent that they believe they’ll be fooled by the GOP’s rhetoric.”

  • “Sure, the GOP budget gives teachers an average pay raise of 3.3 percent, but it’s a paltry sum if the intent is to make up for years of underpaying those entrusted with the future of North Carolina’s children, and thus the future itself.”
  • “not everybody came up short. Tax cuts that will benefit the wealthy will come in 2019, with the personal income tax rate going from 5.499 percent to 5.25 percent, a nice boost for the wealthy but one that won’t make much difference to average folks “
  • “And GOP leaders apparently want to take a bow for not cutting out the Governor’s School (the school has influential friends, some of whom are Republicans) and for cutting the UNC-Chapel Hill law school by $500,000 instead of the threatened $4 million. “

Our View: A state budget that will become a train wreck
Fayetteville Observer // Editorial // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Gov. Roy Cooper says the budget just unveiled in the General Assembly is “the most fiscally irresponsible budget I’ve ever seen.” There he goes again, understated to a fault. It’s all that Cooper said it is, and much worse. It’s either stupid or irrational — or both.”

  • “The only reason to further cut that tax is to serve loud notice that they are deep in the pockets of corporate interests who are far more important to their legislative agenda than the health and welfare of the residents and taxpayers of North Carolina.”
  • “And while the budget does give decent raises to most state employees and even better ones to many teachers, it doesn’t replace the billions that have been taken away from the school funding for teacher assistants, school nurses, supplies, bus replacement and other assistance for districts.”
  • “We’re pleased that the budget includes $10 million for opioid addiction treatment, but that’s a pittance compared to our needs.”

Budget proposal has plenty to like – at first glance
Robesonian // Editorials // June 21, 2017

Summary: “The devil, as they say, is in the details, and as is always the case with budgets as thick as the General Assembly’s that are largely crafted in the backroom, it takes time before all the dark print is illuminated. So we proceed at the risk of eating our own words.”

Legislators could whack legal aid for the needy
Charlotte Observer // Editorial // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Out of sight of most of us, tens of thousands of low-income North Carolinians receive desperately needed free legal help every year…Now legislators plan to ax the $1.7 million of state money that goes to agencies that provide this aid.”

  • “It’s a cut of only 5-6 percent of their total budgets, but legal-aid offices had already seen this pool of money slashed from $6 million to under $2 million in recent years. This finishes the job, and it comes just as President Donald Trump proposes cutting federal money to these same agencies – which would be an even bigger blow.”
NC Senate passes nearly $23B budget, House vote next
North State Journal // Mollie Young // June 21, 2017

Summary: “After only two weeks of closed door negotiations, Republican lawmakers introduced their state budget compromise on Monday and promptly passed it in the state Senate Tuesday. The $22.9 billion biennium budget appears to include significant personal and corporate tax cuts, incremental pay raises for teachers, and a large deposit into the state rainy day fund.”
  • “I want to thank all those who worked really exceptionally hard, I think we have a really good relationship — we spent a lot of time together, know each other a little bit better, and we’re happy with the results,” House budget chair Nelson Dollar (R-Wake) said, followed by laughs from his colleagues, during a press conference Monday evening.

NC Senate votes 38-11 to approve final budget proposal with tax cuts, employee raises
N&O // Colin Campbell // June 20, 2017
Summary: “The N.C. Senate voted 38-11 to pass a $23.03 billion compromise budget plan for the coming fiscal year.Four Democrats joined all Republicans in supporting the budget: Sen. Don Davis of Greene County, Sen. Ben Clark of Raeford, Sen. Joel Ford of Charlotte and Sen. Erica Smith-Ingram of Northampton County.”

Senate gives initial nod to $23B budget
WRAL // Matthew Burns & Travis Fain // June 20, 2017

Summary: “The Senate voted 38-11 Tuesday after relatively little debate in favor of the $23 billion budget legislative leaders have hammered out in recent weeks.A final Senate vote on the spending plan is expected Wednesday. Meanwhile, the House expects to hold its two required votes on the budget on Wednesday and Thursday.”

  • “Berger disputed the characterization of $102 million in new spending in the budget as pork, and he also pushed back on Democratic claims that the budget undercuts Attorney General Josh Stein’s ability to carry out his job.”

Budget funds low-tuition options, aids historically black campuses
N&O // Jane Stancill // June 20, 2017

Summary: “The state budget compromise mandates a $7 million cut to the UNC system, but includes special programs and new support for college campuses that have historically served racial minorities.”

Looking for free Pre-K classes? New NC budget has good news
N&O // Will Doran // June 20, 2017

Summary: “The budget plan North Carolina lawmakers unveiled Monday night would set aside enough money to get rid of about 75 percent of the wait list for NC Pre-K – a list that last year included nearly 5,000 kids.”

GOP state budget preservers airport infrastructure spending, film grants 
Winston-Salem Journal // Richard Craver // June 20, 2017

Summary: “The proposed final state Republican budget would provide money for upgrades to Piedmont Triad International Airport and new money to attract or retain film production in North Carolina”

  • “State Rep. Donny Lambeth, R-Forsyth, had said the CON language had “no chance” of being included in the final state budget.” Lambeth is a legislative health-care expert and former president of N.C. Baptist Hospital.”

NC becomes last state to ‘raise the age’ of teens in court
N&O // Anne Blythe // June 20, 2017

Summary: “On Monday, after many years of lobbying, arm-twisting and numerous criminal justice studies, North Carolina lawmakers agreed that teens ages 16 and 17 no longer will be automatically charged as adults for all crimes. The reform is included in a compromise budget that leaders from both General Assembly chambers rolled out for public view Monday.”

Putting ‘raise the age’ plan in state budget doesn’t end funding concerns
WRAL // Kathryn Brown // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Despite being included in the proposed $23 billion state budget, a plan to end North Carolina’s practice of routinely trying 16- and 17-year-olds as adults continues to be plagued by funding questions.”

  • “Yet, some people remain concerned that diverting thousands of teens into an already strained juvenile justice system will create problems unless more resources – judges, prosecutors, counselors and detention beds – are available.”

Plan bumps criminal age in NC to 18
Robesonian // AP // June 21, 2017

Summary: “North Carolina appears ready to give up being one of the only states that automatically prosecutes 16- and 17-year-olds as adults for crimes.”

N.C. lawmakers earmark resources to fight opioid addiction
Fayetteville Observer // Paul Woolverton // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Legislation moving toward the governor’s desk this week aims to knock down North Carolina’s opioid addiction crisis, but an advocate thinks leaders should do more. Law enforcement and others who face the problem first-hand are watching to see whether the programs will reach their hometowns.”

  • “The $23 billion budget the state legislature is voting on this week has several provisions intended to address opioid addiction. Meanwhile, the state Senate is expected to vote shortly whether to approve the Strengthen Opioid Misuse Prevention Act, also known as the STOP Act. The STOP Act is designed to prevent addictive opioid-based pain medications from being overprescribed.”

NC to offer debit cards for disabled students’ tuition. Fraud was found in Arizona’s program
N&O // Lynn Bonner // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Taxpayer money will be loaded onto debit cards for families to pay disabled children’s private-school tuition and other education expenses under a new state plan.Supporters say these education savings accounts, which give parents $9,000 a year, open more options to disabled children. Critics say the system is ripe for fraud and provides no assurances that students will receive a good education.”

  • “The savings accounts will be open to more children than the grants for special-needs students, said Sen. Michael Lee, a New Hanover Republican who sponsored a bill this year that would have established the savings accounts.”

College athletics public records bill moves forward in House
News & Record // Richard Craver // June 20, 2017

Summary: “A state House committee on Tuesday recommended a bill that would classify communications between UNC system schools and their athletic conferences as public record…The bill says athletic conference communications with UNC schools and documents related to membership would be public record.”

  • The bill’s primary sponsor, Sen. Michael Lee (R-New Hanover) has said the bill is designed to eliminate any confusion that materials held by public universities about these affiliations are accessible.”

Proposed coal ash rule change blasted by environmental groups
N&O // Colin Campbell // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Duke Energy would get a reprieve from a coal ash recycling requirement under legislation introduced in the N.C. Senate last week.”

  • “Duke faces a July 1 deadline to name a third site where it will recycle coal ash for use in cement products; the first two sites were identified earlier this year. But House Bill 374, titled the “Business Freedom Act,” would eliminate the requirement for a third recycling site.”

Final state budget includes $2.9M for boat basin project
Daily Advance // Peter Williams // June 21, 2017

Summary: “The fi­nal $23 bil­lion state bud­get law­mak­ers are set to ap­prove this week in­cludes $2.9 mil­lion to start the boat basin project at the Perquimans Marine In­dus­trial Park.”

  • Thank you to Sen. Bill Cook and Rep. Bob Stein­burg for their sup­port of the Perquimans Marine In­dus­trial Park in ne­go­ti­at­ing (state fund­ing) for the project into the con­fer­ence com­mit­tee bud­get,” she said. “The Perquimans Marine In­dus­trial Park is a project that not only has a valu­able eco­nomic im­pact on Perquimans County, but a sub­stan­tial im­pact on the re­gion through com­mit­ted in­vest­ment, com­mit­ted jobs and new busi­nesses.”

Budget deal signals expansion possibilities for UNC-CH medical and business schools
Herald Sun // Ray Gronberg // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Now in likely its final shape, the state’s fiscal 2017-18 budget has some good news for UNC-Chapel Hill officials who’d like to expand the School of Medicine’s annual crop of trainees – and in a surprising twist, an allocation that could set the stage for the Kenan-Flagler School of Business to do likewise.”

5 things to know about proposed state budget
Asheville Citizen-Times // Mark Barrett // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Taxpayers would pay a little less, teachers would make a little more and a handful of projects in legislative leaders’ districts will hit the jackpot under a new budget bill moving through the General Assembly.”

The NRA is pushing for this gun law in NC and across the country
N&O // Craig Jarvis // June 20, 2017
Summary: “The state House passed a bill this month that pits gun owners against each other. It would nearly eliminate concealed handgun permits and the training that goes with them, and would set the minimum age at 18 to carry a concealed gun. Under current law, people 21 and older can apply for a permit to carry a concealed gun, and anyone 18 or older can carry a handgun openly”

  • “What has given this gun bill momentum — besides the persistent backing of the statewide gun-rights Grass Roots N.C. — is advocacy by the National Rifle Association.”
  • “Republican House members Larry Pittman of Concord, Michael Speciale of New Bern and Chris Millis of Hampstead filed bills rolling back concealed carry permit requirements early in the session this year. “
  • House Bill 746, sponsored by Pittman, Speciale, Millis and Burr, would make it legal for anyone not otherwise prohibited to carry a concealed weapon in most public places without needing a permit”

Wake County braces for financial impact as proposed changes to concealed carry laws move forward
Triangle Business Journal // Danielle Chemtob // June 20, 2017

Summary: “The debate over the future of concealed carry permits in North Carolina is about more than just the right to bear arms — there’s money involved, too.While it’s a small portion of Wake County’s $1.3 billion revenue bag, concealed carry permits poured $365,150 to the county’s coffers last year. In turn, Wake County sends a portion of that revenue to the state.”

  • Rep. Larry Pittman, R-Cabarrus, who introduced the legislation, declined to comment on his bill.”

Fishermen organize a boat parade to highlight problem of fewer fish
N&O // Craig Jarvis // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Saltwater fishermen pulled their boats around the Legislative Building in downtown Raleigh on Tuesday to draw attention to a stalled conservation bill.House Bill 867 is aimed at ensuring protection for what recreational anglers say are declining numbers of fish on the North Carolina coast. It would set standards for conservation and fisheries management based on scientific data, while ensuring that a “reasonable” amount of fish can be caught each year and requiring state environmental regulators to assess whether overfishing has occurred.”

NC billboard bill advertises the influence of business interests
N&O // Editorial // June 20, 2017

Summary: “It is nice to have friends in high places, and the billboard industry in North Carolina has many. One is Rep. David Lewis of Harnett County, who’s chair of the influential House Rules Committee. He’s doing his buddies in the industry a favor with a bill to allow billboard companies to move signs displaced because of road improvements or changes in towns and cities to other commercial or industrial areas in the same city.”

  • Lewis characterizes the forced removal of signs in order for a city to make road improvements ‘an unfair taking of private property without just compensation.’ Taking down a billboard isn’t akin to bulldozing a neighborhood to make way for a highway.”

Gov. Cooper News

With state budget, another face-off looms between Republican legislature, Democratic governor
News & Record // AP // June 20, 2017

Summary: “North Carolina government readied Tuesday for another face-off between Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper and the Republican legislature, this time over a final GOP budget deal with lots of raises and money saved for rainy days but one Cooper still blasted as ‘fiscally irresponsible.’ ”

  • State Rep. Jon Hardister (R-Greensboro) said Tuesday that the proposal ‘is a fiscally responsible budget that will continue to move North Carolina in a positive direction.’ “

Budget advances; Cooper awaits with pen 
Robesonian // AP // June 21, 2017

Summary: “North Carolina government readied Tuesday for another face-off between Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper and the Republican legislature, this time over a final GOP budget deal with lots of raises and money saved for rainy days but one Cooper still blasted as “fiscally irresponsible.”

  • “While GOP budget-writers sprinkled millions of dollars across the state in the final plan to favored nonprofits and programs — critics call it pork — they also would order Cooper’s office to cut administrative costs by 19 percent over two years. The reduction wasn’t in either the House or Senate version of the budget.”

Bertie Co. homeowners finding help post Hurricane Matthew slow going
ABC12 // Adaure Achumba // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Some homeowners in Bertie County are still waiting on federal assistance after Hurricane Matthew.Gov. Roy Cooper spent part of the day touring the area and visiting places hit hard by the storms. Affected home and business owners are telling him that aid from FEMA is not coming fast enough.”

  • “It’s been about a billion dollars in both state and fed funds expended or designated so far on hurricane recovery,” Cooper said. “But the problem is that this is a $4.8 billion problem that our state faces and it is one that other states are facing as well, Louisiana Florida are all looking for additional federal funding.”

Gov. Cooper visits Bertie Co., talks Matthew recovery efforts
WNCT // Josh Birch // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Gov. Roy Cooper visited Bertie County Tuesday and promised to fight for more funding as some residents are still recovering from Hurricane Matthew flooding nine months ago.Cooper is still battling over the budget specifics with the General Assembly.”

Chris Christie’s opioid commission and the future of the ACA
The New Yorker // Margaret Talbot // June 20, 2017

Summary: “The most striking thing about the first meeting of President Trump’s Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis, last Friday, in Washington, D.C., was how normal it was, like a throwback to some earlier, more rational Administration.”

  • “We’re kidding ourselves if we don’t think that what is happening over in Congress, regarding issues of health care, matters to this issue,” Roy Cooper, the governor of North Carolina, who sits on the commission, said, adding, “If we make it harder and more expensive for people to get health-care coverage, it’s going to make this crisis worse.”
Key Targets News – House
Brenden Jones
(none)
Larry Yarborough
(none)
Mike Clampitt
(none)
John Bradford
(none)
Bill Brawley
(none)
Nelson Dollar
NC Senate passes nearly $23B budget, House vote next
North State Journal // Mollie Young // June 21, 2017

Summary: “After only two weeks of closed door negotiations, Republican lawmakers introduced their state budget compromise on Monday and promptly passed it in the state Senate Tuesday. The $22.9 billion biennium budget appears to include significant personal and corporate tax cuts, incremental pay raises for teachers, and a large deposit into the state rainy day fund.”
  • “I want to thank all those who worked really exceptionally hard, I think we have a really good relationship — we spent a lot of time together, know each other a little bit better, and we’re happy with the results,” House budget chair Nelson Dollar (R-Wake) said, followed by laughs from his colleagues, during a press conference Monday evening.
  • “In the 21st century, fulfillment centers are a key component to economic development, and create hundreds of jobs,” House Finance Committee Co-chair Rep. John Szoka (R-Cumberland) said in a statement. “Increasing our competitive advantage in the region with a lower corporate tax rate will play a significant role in the years to come.”
Chris Malone
(none)
Susan Martin
In the pipeline’s path: Property owners object to use of eminent domain
The Wilson Times // Drew Wilson // June 20, 2017

Summary: “There is a bill in the legislature to amend the North Carolina Constitution to prohibit condemnation of property except for public use. House Bill 3 would also give property owners the right to a jury trial in all condemnation cases. Nothing would immediately change if the bill passes. The bill would put a referendum on the ballot and the voters would decide. If passed, the bill would have no effect on the current plan to condemn vast swaths of property to construct the ACP.”
  • “Rep. Susan Martin, R-Wilson, signed on as a co-sponsor of HB3 and Sen. Rick Horner, R-Wilson, is a co-sponsor of an identical bill filed in the Senate.”
Gregory Murphy
N.C. lawmakers earmark resources to fight opioid addiction
Fayetteville Observer // Paul Woolverton // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Legislation moving toward the governor’s desk this week aims to knock down North Carolina’s opioid addiction crisis, but an advocate thinks leaders should do more. Law enforcement and others who face the problem first-hand are watching to see whether the programs will reach their hometowns.”
  • “The $23 billion budget the state legislature is voting on this week has several provisions intended to address opioid addiction. Meanwhile, the state Senate is expected to vote shortly whether to approve the Strengthen Opioid Misuse Prevention Act, also known as the STOP Act. The STOP Act is designed to prevent addictive opioid-based pain medications from being overprescribed.”
  • “The state is trying to stop addiction by treating it as a medical problem, said state Rep. Gregory Murphy, a Republican from Greenville. Murphy, a surgeon who said he prescribes opioid-based painkillers, is the prime sponsor of the STOP Act.”
  • ““Most of these people are not criminals by intent. They’re hooked. They’re addicts” who often have no other criminal records, Murphy said. “You send them to jail, and then all the sudden they’re right back out overdosing on medications again. The recidivism is tremendously high.
John Szoka
NC Senate passes nearly $23B budget, House vote next
North State Journal // Mollie Young // June 21, 2017

Summary: “After only two weeks of closed door negotiations, Republican lawmakers introduced their state budget compromise on Monday and promptly passed it in the state Senate Tuesday. The $22.9 billion biennium budget appears to include significant personal and corporate tax cuts, incremental pay raises for teachers, and a large deposit into the state rainy day fund.”
  • “I want to thank all those who worked really exceptionally hard, I think we have a really good relationship — we spent a lot of time together, know each other a little bit better, and we’re happy with the results,” House budget chair Nelson Dollar (R-Wake) said, followed by laughs from his colleagues, during a press conference Monday evening.
  • “In the 21st century, fulfillment centers are a key component to economic development, and create hundreds of jobs,” House Finance Committee Co-chair Rep. John Szoka (R-Cumberland) said in a statement. “Increasing our competitive advantage in the region with a lower corporate tax rate will play a significant role in the years to come.”
Stephen Ross
(none)
Andy Dulin
(none)
John Blust
Fast times at Capitol High with the NC legislature
Triad City Beat // Brian Clarey and Jordan Green // June 21, 2017

Summary: Gives brief legislative profiles for this session on the Guilford and Forsyth County delegations
  • Sen Trudy Wade
  • John Hardister
  • John Faircloth
  • John Blust
  • Debra Conrad
  • Donny Lambeth
Jonathan Jordan
(none)
Michele Presnell
(none)
Beverly Boswell
(none)
John Sauls
(none)
Donny Lambeth
Fast times at Capitol High with the NC legislature
Triad City Beat // Brian Clarey and Jordan Green // June 21, 2017

Summary: Gives brief legislative profiles for this session on the Guilford and Forsyth County delegations
  • Sen Trudy Wade
  • John Hardister
  • John Faircloth
  • John Blust
  • Debra Conrad
  • Donny Lambeth

GOP state budget preservers airport infrastructure spending, film grants 
Winston-Salem Journal // Richard Craver // June 20, 2017

Summary: “The proposed final state Republican budget would provide money for upgrades to Piedmont Triad International Airport and new money to attract or retain film production in North Carolina”

  • “State Rep. Donny Lambeth, R-Forsyth, had said the CON language had “no chance” of being included in the final state budget.” Lambeth is a legislative health-care expert and former president of N.C. Baptist Hospital.”
Linda Hunt Williams
(none)
Scott Stone
(none)
Larry Pittman
The NRA is pushing for this gun law in NC and across the country
N&O // Craig Jarvis // June 20, 2017
Summary: “The state House passed a bill this month that pits gun owners against each other. It would nearly eliminate concealed handgun permits and the training that goes with them, and would set the minimum age at 18 to carry a concealed gun. Under current law, people 21 and older can apply for a permit to carry a concealed gun, and anyone 18 or older can carry a handgun openly”
  • “What has given this gun bill momentum — besides the persistent backing of the statewide gun-rights Grass Roots N.C. — is advocacy by the National Rifle Association.”
  • “Republican House members Larry Pittman of Concord, Michael Speciale of New Bern and Chris Millis of Hampstead filed bills rolling back concealed carry permit requirements early in the session this year. “
  • House Bill 746, sponsored by Pittman, Speciale, Millis and Burr, would make it legal for anyone not otherwise prohibited to carry a concealed weapon in most public places without needing a permit”

Wake County braces for financial impact as proposed changes to concealed carry laws move forward
Triangle Business Journal // Danielle Chemtob // June 20, 2017

Summary: “The debate over the future of concealed carry permits in North Carolina is about more than just the right to bear arms — there’s money involved, too.While it’s a small portion of Wake County’s $1.3 billion revenue bag, concealed carry permits poured $365,150 to the county’s coffers last year. In turn, Wake County sends a portion of that revenue to the state.”

  • Rep. Larry Pittman, R-Cabarrus, who introduced the legislation, declined to comment on his bill.”
John Faircloth
Fast times at Capitol High with the NC legislature
Triad City Beat // Brian Clarey and Jordan Green // June 21, 2017

Summary: Gives brief legislative profiles for this session on the Guilford and Forsyth County delegations
  • Sen Trudy Wade
  • John Hardister
  • John Faircloth
  • John Blust
  • Debra Conrad
  • Donny Lambeth
Dennis Riddell
(none)

Ted Davis

(none)

John Hardister
Fast times at Capitol High with the NC legislature
Triad City Beat // Brian Clarey and Jordan Green // June 21, 2017

Summary: Gives brief legislative profiles for this session on the Guilford and Forsyth County delegations
  • Sen Trudy Wade
  • John Hardister
  • John Faircloth
  • John Blust
  • Debra Conrad
  • Donny Lambeth
Dana Bumgardner
(none)
Bob Steinburg
Final state budget includes $2.9M for boat basin project
Daily Advance // Peter Williams // June 21, 2017

Summary: “The fi­nal $23 bil­lion state bud­get law­mak­ers are set to ap­prove this week in­cludes $2.9 mil­lion to start the boat basin project at the Perquimans Marine In­dus­trial Park.”
  • Thank you to Sen. Bill Cook and Rep. Bob Stein­burg for their sup­port of the Perquimans Marine In­dus­trial Park in ne­go­ti­at­ing (state fund­ing) for the project into the con­fer­ence com­mit­tee bud­get,” she said. “The Perquimans Marine In­dus­trial Park is a project that not only has a valu­able eco­nomic im­pact on Perquimans County, but a sub­stan­tial im­pact on the re­gion through com­mit­ted in­vest­ment, com­mit­ted jobs and new busi­nesses.”

Senate panel to vote on bill funding COA facilities in Currituck, Dare
Daily Advance // Reggie Ponder // June 20, 2017

Summary: “A Senate panel is expected to vote Wednesday on a bill that would allow College of The Albemarle to use NC Connect bond funds for new facilities in Currituck and Dare counties…House Bill 656, known as a “local bill” because it applies specifically to COA and to projects in Dare and Currituck counties, would make an exception to the state law that prohibits community colleges from using the bond proceeds for facilities they do not own.”

  • “O’Neal praised the efforts of state Rep. Bob Steinburg, R-Chowan, who sponsored the bill.“Rep. Steinburg has gone more than 100 percent for us on this bill.” O’Neal said.”
  • “State Sen. Bill Cook, R-Beaufort, supported moving the bill out the Senate Rules Committee, which enabled it to get its hearing before the Education Committee, according to O’Neal.”
Linda Johnson
(none)
David Lewis
NC billboard bill advertises the influence of business interests
N&O // Editorial // June 20, 2017

Summary: “It is nice to have friends in high places, and the billboard industry in North Carolina has many. One is Rep. David Lewis of Harnett County, who’s chair of the influential House Rules Committee. He’s doing his buddies in the industry a favor with a bill to allow billboard companies to move signs displaced because of road improvements or changes in towns and cities to other commercial or industrial areas in the same city.”
  • Lewis characterizes the forced removal of signs in order for a city to make road improvements ‘an unfair taking of private property without just compensation.’ Taking down a billboard isn’t akin to bulldozing a neighborhood to make way for a highway.”
George Cleveland
(none)
Debra Conrad
Fast times at Capitol High with the NC legislature
Triad City Beat // Brian Clarey and Jordan Green // June 21, 2017

Summary: Gives brief legislative profiles for this session on the Guilford and Forsyth County delegations
  • Sen Trudy Wade
  • John Hardister
  • John Faircloth
  • John Blust
  • Debra Conrad
  • Donny Lambeth
Mark Brody
(none)
Michael Speciale
The NRA is pushing for this gun law in NC and across the country
N&O // Craig Jarvis // June 20, 2017
Summary: “The state House passed a bill this month that pits gun owners against each other. It would nearly eliminate concealed handgun permits and the training that goes with them, and would set the minimum age at 18 to carry a concealed gun. Under current law, people 21 and older can apply for a permit to carry a concealed gun, and anyone 18 or older can carry a handgun openly”
  • “What has given this gun bill momentum — besides the persistent backing of the statewide gun-rights Grass Roots N.C. — is advocacy by the National Rifle Association.”
  • “Republican House members Larry Pittman of Concord, Michael Speciale of New Bern and Chris Millis of Hampstead filed bills rolling back concealed carry permit requirements early in the session this year. “
  • House Bill 746, sponsored by Pittman, Speciale, Millis and Burr, would make it legal for anyone not otherwise prohibited to carry a concealed weapon in most public places without needing a permit”
Donna White
(none)

Holly Grange

(none)

Bert Jones
(none)
Key Target News – Senate
Tamara Barringer
(none)
John Alexander
(none)
Chad Barefoot
(none)
Wesley Meredith
(none)
Trudy Wade
Fast times at Capitol High with the NC legislature
Triad City Beat // Brian Clarey and Jordan Green // June 21, 2017

Summary: Gives brief legislative profiles for this session on the Guilford and Forsyth County delegations
  • Sen Trudy Wade
  • John Hardister
  • John Faircloth
  • John Blust
  • Debra Conrad
  • Donny Lambeth
Michael Lee
NC to offer debit cards for disabled students’ tuition. Fraud was found in Arizona’s program
N&O // Lynn Bonner // June 20, 2017

Summary: “Taxpayer money will be loaded onto debit cards for families to pay disabled children’s private-school tuition and other education expenses under a new state plan.Supporters say these education savings accounts, which give parents $9,000 a year, open more options to disabled children. Critics say the system is ripe for fraud and provides no assurances that students will receive a good education.”
  • “The savings accounts will be open to more children than the grants for special-needs students, said Sen. Michael Lee, a New Hanover Republican who sponsored a bill this year that would have established the savings accounts.”

College athletics public records bill moves forward in House
News & Record // Richard Craver // June 20, 2017

Summary: “A state House committee on Tuesday recommended a bill that would classify communications between UNC system schools and their athletic conferences as public record…The bill says athletic conference communications with UNC schools and documents related to membership would be public record.”

  • The bill’s primary sponsor, Sen. Michael Lee (R-New Hanover) has said the bill is designed to eliminate any confusion that materials held by public universities about these affiliations are accessible.”
Jeff Tarte
(none)
Danny Britt
(none)
Bill Cook
Final state budget includes $2.9M for boat basin project
Daily Advance // Peter Williams // June 21, 2017

Summary: “The fi­nal $23 bil­lion state bud­get law­mak­ers are set to ap­prove this week in­cludes $2.9 mil­lion to start the boat basin project at the Perquimans Marine In­dus­trial Park.”
  • Thank you to Sen. Bill Cook and Rep. Bob Stein­burg for their sup­port of the Perquimans Marine In­dus­trial Park in ne­go­ti­at­ing (state fund­ing) for the project into the con­fer­ence com­mit­tee bud­get,” she said. “The Perquimans Marine In­dus­trial Park is a project that not only has a valu­able eco­nomic im­pact on Perquimans County, but a sub­stan­tial im­pact on the re­gion through com­mit­ted in­vest­ment, com­mit­ted jobs and new busi­nesses.”

Senate panel to vote on bill funding COA facilities in Currituck, Dare
Daily Advance // Reggie Ponder // June 20, 2017

Summary: “A Senate panel is expected to vote Wednesday on a bill that would allow College of The Albemarle to use NC Connect bond funds for new facilities in Currituck and Dare counties…House Bill 656, known as a “local bill” because it applies specifically to COA and to projects in Dare and Currituck counties, would make an exception to the state law that prohibits community colleges from using the bond proceeds for facilities they do not own.”

  • “O’Neal praised the efforts of state Rep. Bob Steinburg, R-Chowan, who sponsored the bill.“Rep. Steinburg has gone more than 100 percent for us on this bill.” O’Neal said.”
  • “State Sen. Bill Cook, R-Beaufort, supported moving the bill out the Senate Rules Committee, which enabled it to get its hearing before the Education Committee, according to O’Neal.”
Dan Bishop
(none)
Jim Davis
(none)
NCDP News / Mentions
(none)
Copyright © 2017 NCDP Press, All rights reserved.
Thank you for receiving emails from NCDP pressOur mailing address is:

NCDP Press

P.O. Box 1926

Raleigh, Nc 27602